Warnings.
micro-seiki.nl

Please be warned.

1. One of our buyers told us that some products can be bought on other Websites. For example: A HS-80 Flywheel at EFDeviceGalaxy.com. This is a fake ad. When buying at that website you will pay for something you never get. 2. Story of a buyer from the Netherlands. FAKE AD Hello Dirk, Yes, especially mentally. It is a waste of money, but the feeling of being kicked like that is very uncomfortable. A little softening is that they at the bank were of the opinion that this was quite cunningly put together. Then you feel a little less silly. Afterwards there were some strange things that should have warned me. It is difficult to give an identity of the 'seller', because it will not be real. In short, it went like this: An advertisement on a German website (quoka.de, a sort of marketplace) that was launched on hifishark. I reacted and received a response from one Mrs. XXX in the UK, stating that she (and the arm) was in the UK and that correspondence would preferably be continued in English. When asked, I received information about the condition of the arm (plus a whole series of photos) and that the handling of the transaction would be done by an intermediary from the UK, a company called vtllogistics.com (complete with a professional-looking website). ). I also received a tracking number that enabled me to check the status of the package on the site. When forwarding the company's mail with the payment details, etc., Mrs XXX also provided a copy of her passport, unsolicited. Two days after the transfer, I received a message from the 'company' that the payment confirmation had been received and that the package would be sent after approval by their administration. Then it became deafeningly quiet. Several emails sent to both the 'company' and Mrs XXX, but no response. Can you help to do anything about this crime. I suspect that passport fraud has been committed and that Mrs XXX knows nothing about it. The given address (in Burnley) does exist, but it is not possible to find out if she actually lives there. The bank does fraud investigation, but the money is of course long gone. I went to hifishark again (that name suddenly got a different note for me) to look at ended transactions and there I met the MAX again, also on quota.de, with the same picture and the same asking price. If I had seen that before, I might not have been pressed. But in retrospect it is always very easy, is not it? This kind of transactions with private individuals have always gone well up to now, up to and including Russia, so the suspicion keeps getting worse. That has now risen to royal proportions! Greeting,
Warnings.
micro-seiki.nl

Please be warned.

1. One of our buyers told us that some products can be bought on other Websites. For example: A HS-80 Flywheel at EFDeviceGalaxy.com. This is a fake ad. When buying at that website you will pay for something you never get. 2. Story of a buyer from the Netherlands. FAKE AD Hello Dirk, Yes, especially mentally. It is a waste of money, but the feeling of being kicked like that is very uncomfortable. A little softening is that they at the bank were of the opinion that this was quite cunningly put together. Then you feel a little less silly. Afterwards there were some strange things that should have warned me. It is difficult to give an identity of the 'seller', because it will not be real. In short, it went like this: An advertisement on a German website (quoka.de, a sort of marketplace) that was launched on hifishark. I reacted and received a response from one Mrs. XXX in the UK, stating that she (and the arm) was in the UK and that correspondence would preferably be continued in English. When asked, I received information about the condition of the arm (plus a whole series of photos) and that the handling of the transaction would be done by an intermediary from the UK, a company called vtllogistics.com (complete with a professional-looking website). ). I also received a tracking number that enabled me to check the status of the package on the site. When forwarding the company's mail with the payment details, etc., Mrs XXX also provided a copy of her passport, unsolicited. Two days after the transfer, I received a message from the 'company' that the payment confirmation had been received and that the package would be sent after approval by their administration. Then it became deafeningly quiet. Several emails sent to both the 'company' and Mrs XXX, but no response. Can you help to do anything about this crime. I suspect that passport fraud has been committed and that Mrs XXX knows nothing about it. The given address (in Burnley) does exist, but it is not possible to find out if she actually lives there. The bank does fraud investigation, but the money is of course long gone. I went to hifishark again (that name suddenly got a different note for me) to look at ended transactions and there I met the MAX again, also on quota.de, with the same picture and the same asking price. If I had seen that before, I might not have been pressed. But in retrospect it is always very easy, is not it? This kind of transactions with private individuals have always gone well up to now, up to and including Russia, so the suspicion keeps getting worse. That has now risen to royal proportions! Greeting,